Diary of A Fenugreek Microgreen!

January 02, 2020 11 Comments

Diary of A Fenugreek Microgreen!

Fenugreek is predominantly used in Indian cuisine and can be used fresh or dried for spice (think curry powder)!  Fenugreek microgreens are a bit bitter, spicy, & nutty all at once. From our experience with this beautiful Hamama crew, you’re either a lover or hater of fenugreek microgreens lol! No matter what, it doesn’t hurt to try it once and see which camp you’re in!  Let us know if you’re Team Fenugreek or not - we can’t wait to hear what you think!

Oftentimes these little fenu-greens can be a little confusing to watch grow - they’re definitely very different from all the other Hamama microgreens!  It takes a bit longer to sprout up and balloon the Seed Quilt than other varieties, its seeds typically don’t fall easily from the leaves, and the more golden-brown color can be surprising to first-time fenugreek growers.  


 

Day 1- Planting your Fragrant Fenugreek Seed Quilt

For setup, just follow the regular simple Hamama instructions like you always do! Here is an electronic version of our instructions if you need a quick refresher.

The initial soak is always the most important step in the process as it provides the seeds in your quilt with the water to jumpstart the germination process. You want to first add water (filtered is best) to the fill line which is about 3 cups of water. Then you want to add the quilt! To ensure that it is adequately soaked, be sure to hold it down long enough for the quilt to turn a shade darker (10-30 seconds). A good trick is to flick the seed quilt! If the seeds roll around in their pods, that is a good sign it is too dry and could soak for just a touch longer. After the soak, you want to be sure that the quilt is properly propped on the tray's bottom ribs so that neither side of the quilt is dipping into the water. You also want to be sure the seed pockets are not underwater after the dunk! Here are some extra watering tips


Fenugreek seeds are larger than most other microgreen seeds, so just be extra sure to really soak this quilt sufficiently.



 Day 2- The cover starts puffing!

Seeds are germinating slightly as you can see the Seed Quilt has started to “puff up” a bit!  Right on track.

 

Day 3- The paper top is starting to separate! 

Excitttttttting! 

Day 4-Still goin’!
Not many changes to note here yet! Soon we will be able to remove the paper top so that they can get the airflow and light they need to continue growing!

Day 5- Almost ready for “peel” day!! 

The seeds have germinated more and have pushed up against the paper on the edges. The coconut mat is separating a bit from the seed quilt, but resist fussing with it! Those healthy fuzzy roots under there will be just fine!

Day 6- PEEL DAY! 

Our little friends are showing their green/gold colors! (Any other Green Bay Packers fans out there?) I carefully peeled the top as to avoid pulling the roots up.

Think you see mold? It is likely just fuzzy/furry, white ROOT HAIRS! These are commonly mistaken for mold due to their similar appearance, but they are totally safe & healthy (and way cuter than mold 😉). 

Root hairs are bright white and always appear to congregate around the root itself. They help the greens grow by giving them nutrients and absorbing water! Read more about root hairs here!   

Day 7- What a HUGE difference a day makes!
Look at the height of these greens already! Measuring about 2 inches at this point. I added a touch more water again at this point because it’s winter here in Milwaukee and the heat has been making the air for my greens particularly dry. I added about 1 cup more water so the water was up to the ridges on the bottom of the tray, but not all the way back up to the fill line.

Day 8- Getting taller and taller!
At this stage, they don’t look like they are necessarily “thriving” like some of the other thicker & greener micros. Don’t worry - this is normal - just be patient & hang in there! :)

Day 9- Color is now a brighter green while the seed hulls attached mostly remain a golden hue. 

They are about 4 inches tall at this point! So close to harvesting! 

The seeds stuck on top of the grown microgreens are the “hull” - this is normal! Lots of people like leaving the hulls and enjoy the extra crunch.  If you prefer to remove them, you can move the greens around in a bowl of cool water after harvesting. This should make most of the seeds detach. Properly dry the greens on a paper towel after removing from the water then use or store as desired! Another tip for removing them is to “pet” the tops of the greens to loosen occasionally. Ensure your hands are washed when handling, just like any other food item!

When growing fenugreek, you can supplement your regular indoor ceiling lighting with a desk lamp for a few hours per day after you peel the cover if you’d like to see juicier, lusher leaves for aesthetic reasons!  This addition would let those leaves bush out a bit more and also help loosen the seed hulls if you don’t like those!

Day 12 (Nothing notable for the previous 2 days)- HARVEST DAY! 

I harvested my fenugreek greens on day 12 and they were about 5 inches tall. As you can see, I got a nice lush & tall harvest. They really could be harvested a bit sooner, at the recommended day 10 or when they reach about 4 inches tall.  

How to eat your fenugreek microgreens: 

Check out some of our personal favorite recipes for this unique microgreen here!

 

Storing your Fenugreek Microgreens: 

If you find you can’t use all of your fresh Fenugreek microgreens right away, you can freeze or dry them for later use! To freeze, simply place your harvested microgreens in a tupperware of baggie and store in the freezer for later use in smoothies, stir fries, or curries! To dry, spread your microgreens on a sheet and bake at the lowest temperature setting for 20 minutes. Then mix into sauces, use for tea, or sprinkle on top of dishes as a curry-like spice! 

Caveats: 

  • Eating these could make you smell maple-syrup-y for up to a few days!  You might like it, you might not! We recommend starting with a small serving (maybe ⅛ of a Seed Quilt) and seeing what you think :)
  • There are a lot of claims out there about fenugreek - be sure to do your own research and consult with your care provider if you have existing conditions or are looking to use fenugreek for medical reasons: https://nccih.nih.gov/health/fenugreek


11 Responses

Cobie Hoek
Cobie Hoek

May 19, 2020

I love all other seed products except this one. I had to give it much longer time to grow but still after twice the time the hulls had not come off. I had to throw them away. That was a waste of money. But hey, You live you learn.
No more Fenugreek for me.

Kathie Chandler
Kathie Chandler

January 05, 2020

Thank you so much , I have not been patience enough and eating them to young ! I do however love them !

Marita Kubersky
Marita Kubersky

January 04, 2020

Thanks for the info about fenugreek! I was struggling a bit, but didn’t want to give them up. The sprouts are purported to be especially good for the lymphatic system, something I need having had lymphoma. I really appreciate the help with growing them!

Melissa
Melissa

January 04, 2020

I grow the greens for my pet quail & couldn’t figure out where the sweet smell was coming from. Turns out these make birds smell like maple syrup, too! They love all the greens & fenugreek is especially good for them, so I’ll have birds who smell like breakfast a lot. Good tips, thanks!

JohannaNoel
JohannaNoel

January 03, 2020

Very nice photos. I don’t care for the seed hulls that cling to the leaves so I spritz them with water from a spray bottle and they soften quickly, then I pick them off. I do this several days in a row before harvest.

Lisa Russ
Lisa Russ

January 03, 2020

this was helpful because of the golden color I thought I had messed them up leaving the top on an extra and that they had dried out

Sandy
Sandy

January 03, 2020

I really love the fenugreek microgreens, but I want more leafy green surface area. So, when they’re about halfway done growing, i very gently begin picking the hull off the leaves. I don’t force it, so if a hull is not ready to come off easily, it waits. I’ll work on a section at a time while I’m doing something else, like waiting for my coffee to brew. I have found that gently removing the hull while they are still growing produces a bright and slightly larger fenugreek microgreen.

Lisa Soni
Lisa Soni

January 03, 2020

would you mind sending me this fenugreek greens you are now offering? Charge to my 0939 account.. Thanks , Lisa

Sean M. Goodman
Sean M. Goodman

January 03, 2020

Oh! Is that what the brush in the harvesting kit is for? 😹

Gail
Gail

January 03, 2020

Thanks so much! Your tips are really helpful. I thought that perhaps I had done something wrong with the first batch I grew, so now I’ll know how to grow the next seed quilt.

Heather
Heather

January 03, 2020

Love the fenugreek and nice to see mine look right on target and like yours. I love how big and impressive they look- I like to dress wraps and jicama slices with them! I love the flavor and significant crunch. I do occasionally notice the top takes off and the roots dangle a bit before they get to the choir layer. I just gently pressed mine back down and they didn’t seem to suffer any. Mine did it also by peel day. I store mine in a refrigerator bag designed to keep produce fresh and they last easily 2 weeks in there.

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