Micogreen Varieties Ranked by Difficulty Level

February 02, 2022

Micogreen Varieties Ranked by Difficulty Level

Hi Hamama Friends!

 

As you know, our Hamama Grow Kit system makes it easy for anyone to grow microgreens from the comfort of home! Hamama offers more than 10 varieties of microgreen Seed Quilts to grow and, although starting the process is simple no matter which greens you choose, they are all a little unique - That’s what makes them all so special 💚

 

We’ve outlined each Seed Quilt's nuances and how you can take extra special care of them so you get a perfect harvest every time! We’ve included some helpful resources for each that will help you along your growing journeys no matter what variety you choose.

 

We have ranked each variety by difficulty level below. If you are new to growing microgreens with Hamama, we recommend starting with the beginner Seed Quilts then moving your way up.

 

Beginner

  • Spicy Daikon Radish
    • Pink Radish
    • Violet Radish
    • Red Radish
    • Rainbow Radish
  • Energizing Kale
  • Refreshing Cabbage
  • Garlicky Chives

 

Intermediate

  • Clover
  • Hearty Broccoli
  • Sweet Wheatgrass
  • Wasabi Mustard
  • Crisp Carrot

 

Advanced

  • Super Salad Mix
  • Zesty Mix
  • Culinary Cilantro
  • Fenugreek
  • Peppery Arugula
  • Springtime Peas

Spicy Daikon Radish

 

We offer 4 varieties of our popular Radish Microgreens: Spicy Daikon Radish, Pink Radish, Violet Radish, and Red Radish. These will all grow very similarly to each other, are super consistent and reliable, low-drama, and are the fastest of our varieties to grow. Here are a few things to look for when growing:

  • Under-Soaking! Since Radish greens have a larger than average seed size, it is more common to under-soak than to oversoak the Seed Quilt. Undersoaking occurs when the seeds do not absorb enough water during the soaking step. This means the quilt may need a slightly firmer/longer press into the water enough for the water to go through the mat and up to the seeds. Just be sure the top paper turns a shade darker from absorbing enough water and it'll be good to grow!

Resource:  Soaking Blog, Soaking Video

  • Root Hairs! Radish microgreens are well known for their root hairs, which are small fibers that emerge from the base of the root. They have a similar appearance to white mold which can create some panic to new growers. Don't fret! Root hairs are a natural characteristic of microgreens that aid in the gathering and retention of water! They’re a great sign of healthy greens 👍 Check the blog post below for photo examples of root hairs vs. mold to be sure.

Resource:  Root Hair Blog

  • Wilting Greens! Our Radish microgreens grow very quickly which means they may absorb the water in your tray at a quicker pace then other varieties. To prevent your greens from wilting prematurely, we always encourage users to keep a close eye on the water level of their tray when you are nearing your harvest day. You want to be sure the roots always have enough water to drink from 💧 You want the water level to be around the tray's bottom ribs and no higher after the initial soak as the roots need an oxygen gap to breathe. Never refill the water back up to the fill line after soaking.

Resource:  Watering Tips

If you are interested in seeing the growing process of this variety be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

Energizing Kale 

Growing Difficulty: Beginner!

 

Kale microgreens are a great and easy flavor for beginners and, if you’ve eaten adult kale before, you already know what to expect when it comes to their taste! Although these are not very fussy when it comes to their growing standards, we recommend looking out for the following:

  • Overwatering! Kale seeds are pretty small, meaning they may absorb water more quickly than radish or our other larger seed varieties. It's very important to keep an eye on the water level both prior to the soaking step and immediately following the soaking step. Something to remember for all seed varieties is that you never want the seed portion of the Seed Quilt to be sitting or sloshing around in the water. If there is water pooling on top of the seeds, lift your quilt up and let it drain out for a few seconds and pour a tiny bit of water out of the tray. The water level should be at the mid to top portion of the coconut mat after the initial soak and no higher.

Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips

  • Colder Temps! Most microgreens are sensitive to colder temperatures (65 degrees and below), which can stunt or prevent full germination. This in turn can throw off their peel time, watering cycles, and total grow time. Ideally the greens should be kept somewhere between 67F-80F and away from any windows where it could be a few degrees cooler.

Resources: Colder Temp Blog Post

  • Longer Peel Time! Most of our microgreens can begin to sprout anywhere between days 2-3 with the exception of a few varieties. You might not see as much action early on with kale micros, depending on your growing environment. The recommended peel time for Kale is between days 5-6. The quilt itself will let you know when it’s ready to peel (by fully balooning or ripping) so be sure not to peel too early. The seeds need the top layer to encourage their roots to penetrate the bottom of the mat. By peeling too early, you risk having the roots stay above the mat, which would cause them to dry out.

Resources: How to Peel 


If you are interested in seeing the Growth Journey for Kale, be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

Refreshing Cabbage 

Growing Difficulty: Beginner!

 

Our cabbage microgreen is another first-time friendly variety that offers a beautiful and unique color from what you may be used to seeing. It has beautiful dark green leaves and purple stems that give all your dishes a nice *pop* of color (these make for a stunning garnish). Here are a couple of tips to keep in mind when growing:

  • Overwatering! Cabbage also has smaller seeds so it's important to keep an eye on the water level both prior to the soaking step and immediately following the soaking step. Something to remember for all seed varieties is that you never want the seed portion of the Seed Quilt to be sitting or sloshing around in the water. If there is water pooling on top of the seeds, lift your quilt up and let it drain out for a few seconds and pour a tiny bit of water out of the tray. The water level should be at the mid to top portion of the coconut mat after the initial soak and no higher.

Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips

  • Longer Peel Time! Most of our microgreens can begin to sprout anywhere between days 2-3 with the exception of a few varieties. You might not see as much action early on with cababge micros, depending on your growing environment. The recommended peel time for Kale is between days 5-6. The quilt itself will let you know when it’s ready to peel (by fully balooning or ripping) so be sure not to peel too early. The seeds need the top layer to encourage their roots to penetrate the bottom of the mat. By peeling too early, you risk having the roots stay above the mat, which would cause them to dry out.

Resources: How to Peel 

  • Colder Temps! Most microgreens are sensitive to colder temperatures (65 degrees and below), which can stunt or prevent full germination. This in turn can throw off their peel time, watering cycles, and total grow time. Ideally the greens should be kept somewhere between 67F-80F and away from any windows where it could be a few degrees cooler.

Resources: Colder Temp Blog Post

If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Cabbage, be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

Garlicky Chives

Growing Difficulty: Beginner!

 

As part of our micro-herb family, Garlicky Chives has become a very popular addition to the varieties that we offer. The Garlicky Chives seeds and full-grown microgreens look and taste quite different than the rest of our offerings. Here's what to look out for when growing them:

  • Longer Peel & Grow Time! Garlicky Chives Microgreens take a bit longer to sprout than the other varieties that we offer. For this reason, it is very important to have just a *bit* more patience when growing them. The recommended peel time for Garlicky Chives is between 6-7 days but could be longer depending on your environment (see Colder Temps). Given that, the quilt itself will let you know when it’s ready to peel so be sure not to peel too early or too late. The average grow time is 8-10 days.
  •  The top ⅓ of each micro-herb will fold or “hook” over - this is the best time to harvest them!

Resources: How to Peel 

  • Colder Temps! Garlicky Chives are mildly sensitive to colder temperatures (65 degrees and below), which can stunt or prevent full germination. This in turn can throw off their peel time, watering cycles, and total grow time. Ideally the greens should be kept somewhere between 67F-80F and away from any windows where it could be a few degrees cooler.

Resources: Colder Temp Blog Post

  • Seed Hulls! Chive microgreens naturally have their seed hulls attached when finished growing. Although they are completely edible, if you are not a fan of them there are some ways you can encourage them to fall off. Brushing your hand over the top of the greens as they are growing, soaking the greens in water after harvest, or even supplying the greens with an extra light source after the peel to encourage the seeds to open a little more.

If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Garlicky Chives, be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

Earthy Clover 

Growing Difficulty: Intermediate!

 

Clover microgreens are small but mighty microgreens that pack a big flavor into their tiny leaves. These microgreens grow very densely but only reach a height of about 1.5 to 2 inches, which may catch new growers of guard. Below are some important things to look for when growing clover:

  • Overwatering! Clover has smaller seeds so it's important to keep an eye on the water level both prior to the soaking step and immediately following the soaking step. Something to remember for all seed varieties is that you never want the seed portion of the Seed Quilt to be sitting or sloshing around in the water. If there is water pooling on top of the seeds, lift your quilt up and let it drain out for a few seconds and pour a tiny bit of water out of the tray. The water level should be at the mid to top portion of the coconut mat after the initial soak and no higher.

      Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips

  • Peel Time! Because clover has more densely packed seeds, it’s important to peel the top layer off once the majority of the seeds have sprouted in order to provide necessary oxygen flow. You want to minimize the amount of time these are covered so they aren’t at risk of molding. The quilt itself will let you know when it’s ready to peel by ballooning or ripping, and you will also see that the seedlings have mostly germinated. You don't want to peel too early, just keep an eye on the quilt and peel as soon as it looks ready.

Resources: How to Peel 

  • Height of greens! Clover microgreens do not grow to be very tall, so if you're comparing them to other varieties, you may think they haven't reached their maturity by the time suggested on the label. However, that is not the case - These are ready to be harvested at around 1.5-2 inches (~10 days) for optimal flavor and texture.

Resources: When and how to harvest

If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Clover, be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

Hearty Broccoli 

Growing Difficulty: Intermediate!

 

Our Broccoli microgreens are one of our most popular varieties not only because they are so yummy but also because they offer a plethora of health benefits and nutrients! These greens are placed in the intermediate category because they are what we like to call *diva* greens, meaning they can be a little sensitive when it comes to their growth journey. Below are some quirks to look for when growing broccoli:

  • Overwatering! Broccoli has a high risk of overwatering not only because of it's smaller seeds, but because even the slightest bit of extra water can be hard for it to handle. It's very important to keep an eye on the water level both prior to the soaking step and immediately following the soaking step. Something to remember for all seed varieties is that you never want the seed portion of the Seed Quilt to be sitting or sloshing around in the water. If there is water pooling on top of the seeds, lift your quilt up and let it drain out for a few seconds and pour a tiny bit of water out of the tray. The water level should be at the mid to top portion of the coconut mat after the initial soak and no higher.

Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips, Root Hair Blog

  • Colder Temps! Most microgreens tend to be sensitive to colder temperatures but broccoli microgreens tend to be even more so. Cold temps can cause the greens to take longer to germinate which in turn can throw off their entire growth and watering cycles. Ideally the greens should be kept somewhere between 67F-85F and away from any windows where it could be a few degrees cooler.

Resources: Colder Temp Blog Post

  • Earlier Peel Time! Broccoli microgreens have a peel date of 4-5 days which is a little shorter than some of our other varieties. It's important to peel these when they have sprouted so that the greens can get some oxygen flow to keep growing seamlessly. You want to minimize the amount of time these are covered so they aren’t at risk of molding. The quilt itself will let you know when it’s ready to peel by ballooning or ripping, and you will also see that the seedlings have mostly germinated. You don't want to peel too early, just keep an eye on the quilt and peel as soon as it looks ready.

Resources: How to Peel, When and how to harvest


If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Broccoli, be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

Sweet Wheatgrass

Growing Difficulty: Intermediate!

 

Our Sweet Wheatgrass is very unique in a lot of ways. It is the only one of our greens that produces a second harvest, it has the shortest peel time, it has very large seeds, and it grows to be very tall! Below are some things to look out for when growing Wheatgrass:

  • Under-Soaking! Since Wheatgrass has a larger than average seed size, it is more common to under-soak than to oversoak the Seed Quilt. Undersoaking occurs when the seeds do not absorb enough water during the soaking step. This means the quilt may need a slightly firmer/longer press into the water enough for the water to go through the mat and up to the seeds. Just be sure the top paper turns a shade darker from absorbing enough water and it'll be good to grow!

Resource:  Soaking Blog, Soaking Video

  • Peel Time! The peel time for wheatgrass can be a little tricky for first-time growers. Although wheatgrass has a shorter recommended peel time of 2-3 days, it is important not to peel too soon. This is because the roots must be able to penetrate the coco-mat prior to peeling and the top layer really helps with this process. If peeled too soon the roots may not be able to go through the mat and they may consequently dry out. The seeds won't always look full germinated but the top paper will fully balloon or rip.

Resources: How to Peel 

  • Mold! Wheatgrass in general is known to produce a common, non-harmful blue-green mold around the seeds. This can look a little off if you aren’t familiar with growing wheatgrass, but it is nothing to fear! Just be sure to watch the water levels (be careful of over-watering) and air flow to minimize the chances for it to develop. You can also use food-grade hydrogren peroxide or grapefuit seed oil in your grow tray when growing this variety out to help combat this.

Resources: Watering Tips, How to avoid mold

If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Wheatgrass, be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

Hot Wasabi Mustard 

Growing Difficulty: Intermediate!

 

Our Hot Wasabi Mustard is an excellent, intermediate Seed Quilt variety that offers a unique “zingy” taste which is very on par with it's name! Although it is similar to our other greens when it comes to its appearance, there are a couple of things to look out for when growing it:

  • Overwatering! Hot Wasabi Mustard has a higher risk of overwatering both because of it's smaller seeds and also because it can be sensitive to even a small amount of extra water. It's very important to keep an eye on the water level both prior to the soaking step and immediately following the soaking step. Something to remember for all seed varieties is that you never want the seed portion of the Seed Quilt to be sitting or sloshing around in the water. If there is water pooling on top of the seeds, lift your quilt up and let it drain out for a few seconds and pour a tiny bit of water out of the tray. The water level should be at the mid to top portion of the coconut mat after the initial soak and no higher.

Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips, Root Hair Blog

  • Longer Peel Time! Most of our microgreens can begin to sprout anywhere between days 2-3 with the exception of a few varieties. The recommended peel time for Hot Wasabi Mustard is between 5-7 days which is a bit later than most. Given that, the quilt itself will let you know when it’s ready to peel so be sure not to peel too early or too late.

Resources: How to Peel 

  • Colder Temps! Most microgreens are very sensitive to colder temperatures which can stunt or prevent full germination. This in turn can throw off their peel time, watering cycles, and total grow time. Ideally the greens should be kept somewhere between 67F-80F and away from any windows where it could be a few degrees cooler.

Resources: Colder Temp Blog Post

If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Hot Wasabi Mustard be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

Crisp Carrot 

Growing Difficulty: Intermediate!

Carrot microgreens are sweet, refreshing and earthy. They can be enjoyed raw as a garnish to sandwiches, salads, wraps, pasta dishes, omelets or whatever else you can think up! They can also be used to make a sweet superfood smoothie or a bright and fresh pesto. Below are some things to keep in mind when growing them!

 

  • Overwatering! Carrot has some of the smallest seeds of all our varieties so it's very important to keep an eye on the water level both prior to the soaking step and immediately following the soaking step. We recommend filling the tray slightly below the fill line initially to avoid any excess water. Something to remember for all seed varieties is that you never want the seeds to be sitting in water. If your quilt is floating or submerged in water after the soaking step, it's best to dump a little out.

Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips

 

  • Longer Peel Time! Most of our microgreens can begin to sprout anywhere between days 2-3 with the exception of a few varieties. The recommended peel time for Carrots is between 8-10 days which is later than most. Given that, the quilt itself will let you know when it’s ready to peel so be sure not to peel too early or too late.

Resources: How to Peel 

 

  • Seed Hulls! Carrot Microgreens naturally have their seed hulls attached when finished growing. Although they are completely edible, if you are not a fan of them there are some ways you can encourage them to fall off. Brushing your hand over the top of the greens as they are growing, soaking the greens in water after harvest, or even supplying the greens with an extra light source after the peel to encourage the seeds to open a little more.

 

  • Longer Grow Time! The average grow time for Carrot microgreens is anywhere from 14-20 days which is the longest of any of our varieties! Because of this it is super important to avoid over-watering your quilt but also being sure to check the water level.If you need to add water, just bring the level back up to the bottom of the coconut mat and avoid pouring water directly over the seeds. Try to keep the tray in a darker (but not cold) area for the first week for better germination (or cover the tray slightly with a book or magazine, still allowing for airflow).

Resources: Watering Tips, Saving Overwatered Quilt, 


If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Crip Carrot Microgreens be sure to check out its Growing Diary!

Super Salad Mix

Growing Difficulty: Advanced!

 

Our Super Salad Mix is one of our most popular varieties due to the delicious blend of greens inside the single Seed Quilt. It contains broccoli, kale, arugula, kohlrabi, cauliflower, and cabbage! Super Salad is categorized as a variety for advanced growers for the reasons listed below:

  • Overwatering! Super Salad Mix is at high risk of overwatering both because of it's seed size and variety of seeds. This Seed Quilt contains arugula seeds, which are mucilaginous (kind of like chia seeds!). This means they produce a gelatinous substance composed of proteins (which helps the seed to retain moisture), so they can be very sensitive to even a small amount of extra water.  
    • Fill your tray to a little below the initial fill line on your tray. Soak the Seed Quilt as normal, making sure the top layer turns a shade darker from absorbing water. Gently lift the seed layer of the quilt and let water drip off of it for a few seconds. Reattach the seed layer onto the coconut mat in the tray.
    • The water level should remain around the bottom half of the coconut mat for the first few days, slowly receding.

Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips, Root Hair Blog, How to avoid mold

  • Colder Temps! Super Salad tends to be quite sensitive to colder temperatures, which can stunt or prevent full germination. This in turn can throw off their peel time, watering cycles, and total grow time. Ideally the greens should be kept somewhere between 67F-80F and away from any windows where it could be a few degrees cooler.

Resources: Colder Temp Blog Post

If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Super Salad Mix, be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

Zesty Mix

Growing Difficulty: Advanced!

 

Our Zesty Mix is one of our most popular varieties due to the yummy blend of greens in one Seed Quilt. It contains broccoli, kale, arugula, kohlrabi, mustard, and cabbage. Zesty Mix is intended for an advanced grower for the reasons listed below:

  • Overwatering! Zesty Mix is at high risk of overwatering both because of it's seed size and variety of seeds. This Seed Quilt contains arugula seeds, which are mucilaginous (kind of like chia seeds!). This means they produce a gelatinous substance composed of proteins (which helps the seed to retain moisture), so they can be very sensitive to even a small amount of extra water.  
    • Fill your tray to a little below the initial fill line on your tray. Soak the Seed Quilt as normal, making sure the top layer turns a shade darker from absorbing water. Gently lift the seed layer of the quilt and let water drip off of it for a few seconds. Reattach the seed layer onto the coconut mat in the tray.
    • The water level should remain around the bottom half of the coconut mat for the first few days, slowly receding.

Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips, Root Hair Blog, How to avoid mold 

  • Colder Temps! Zesty Mix tends to be quite sensitive to colder temperatures, which can stunt or prevent full germination. This in turn can throw off their peel time, watering cycles, and total grow time. Ideally the greens should be kept somewhere between 67F-80F and away from any windows where it could be a few degrees cooler.  

Resources: Colder Temp Blog Post

If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Zesty Mix, be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

Culinary Cilantro

Growing Difficulty: Advanced!

 

As the first addition to our micro-herb family, Cilantro has become a very popular addition to the varieties that we offer! There a some differences between it and our regular microgreen varieties to look out for when growing them:

  • Longer Peel Time! Cilantro Microgreens tend to take the longest to sprout out of all the varieties that we offer. For this reason it is very important to have just a *bit* more patience when growing them. The recommended peel time for Cilantro Microgreens Is between 7-8 days but could be longer depending on your environment (see Colder Temps). Given that, the quilt itself will let you know when it’s ready to peel so be sure not to peel too early. The seeds need the top layer to encourage their roots to penetrate the bottom of the mat. By peeling too early, you risk having the roots stay above the mat, which would cause them to dry out.

Resources: How to Peel 

  • Colder Temps! Cilantro is very sensitive to colder temperatures which can cause them to take even longer to germinate. This in turn can throw off their entire growth and watering cycles! Ideally the greens should be kept somewhere between 67F-80F and away from any windows where it could be a few degrees cooler.

Resources: Colder Temp Blog Post

  • Overwatering! Cilantro is at risk of being overwatered due to the amount of time it can take to germinate. It's important not to add any water to your tray even if you are not seeing much growth in the first several days. Adding too much water before you peel the top will have an effect on your greens and can increase the risk of mold formation.
    • Shake your Seed Quilt before planting to evenly distribute the seeds to avoid overcrowding - because of the naturally lower germination rate for cilantro, we pack lots of seeds in the pockets to allow for a full harvest!
    • Fill your tray to a little below the initial fill line on your tray. Soak the Seed Quilt as normal, making sure the top layer turns a shade darker from absorbing water. Gently lift the seed layer of the quilt and let water drip off of it for a few seconds. Reattach the seed layer onto the coconut mat in the tray.
    • The water level should remain around the bottom half of the coconut mat for the first few days, slowly receding.

Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips, Root Hair Blog, How to avoid mold 

  • Seed Hulls! Cilantro Microgreens naturally have their seed hulls attached when finished growing. Although they are completely edible, if you are not a fan of them there are some ways you can encourage them to fall off. Brushing your hand over the top of the greens as they are growing, soaking the greens in water after harvest, or even supplying the greens with an extra light source after the peel to encourage the seeds to open a little more.

If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Culinary Cilantro, be sure to check out it's Virtual Growing Diary and written Growing Diary!

Fragrant Fenugreek

Growing Difficulty: Advanced!

 

From our experience with this beautiful Hamama crew, you’re either a lover or hater of fenugreek microgreens. No matter what, it doesn’t hurt to try it once and see which camp you’re in! Oftentimes these little greens can be a little confusing to watch grow - they’re visually different from the other Hamama microgreens! They may take a bit longer to germinate and sprout up than other varieties, it's seeds typically don’t fall easily from the leaves, and the more golden-brown color can be surprising to first-time fenugreek growers. Here are some things to be mindful of when growing them:

  • Longer Peel Time! Fenugreek Microgreens take just a bit longer to sprout than some of the other varieties that we offer. For this reason it is very important to have just a *bit* more patience when growing them. The recommended peel time for Fenugreek Microgreens Is between 5-6 days but could be longer depending on your environment (see Colder Temps). Given that, the quilt itself will let you know when it’s ready to peel so be sure not to peel too early or too late. 

Resources: How to Peel 

  • Colder Temps! Fenugreek microgreens are sensitive to colder temperatures which can cause them to take longer to germinate. This in turn can throw off their entire growth and watering cycles. Ideally the greens should be kept somewhere between 67F-90F and away from any windows where it could be a few degrees cooler.

Resources: Colder Temp Blog Post

  • Underwatering! Fenugreek is more at risk of being under-watered due how large the seeds are. It may take a more mindful and thorough initial soak to ensure all of the seeds are able to absorb enough water. You don't want to be careless with water level, as that can drown the seeds, you just want to be sure to soak long enough for the top paper to turn a shade darker from absorbing a suffient amount of water.

Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips, Root Hair Blog

  • Seed Hulls! Fenugreek Microgreens naturally have their seed hulls attached when finished growing. Although they are completely edible, if you are not a fan of them there are some ways you can encourage them to fall off. Brushing your hand over the top of the greens as they are growing, soaking the greens in water after harvest, or even supplying the greens with an extra light source after the peel to encourage the seeds to open a little more.

If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Fragrant Fenugreek, be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

Peppery Arugula

Growing Difficulty: Advanced!

 

Our Arugula Seed Quilt is one of our most popular varieties for it's savory and peppery flavor, but it is a bit fussier to grow. Arugula microgreens require 3 green thumbs for the following reasons:

  • Peel & Grow Time! Peppery Arugula microgreens take just a tad longer to germinate and mature than some of the other varieties that we offer. The peel time is about 6 days and they will finish maturing by around day 10 so you need to have just a tad more patience when growing them.
    • Don't peel too early! You don't want to fuss with them frequently while they germinate. Mucilaginous seeds are very sticky and tend to adhere to the top paper of the Seed Quilt. When you lift the cover prematurely, the seeds may stick to it and increase the chance of killing some of the seedings.

Resources: How to Peel 

  • Overwatering! Pay special attention to the initial soak and water level as the seeds are more susceptible to moisture. Arugula seeds are mucilaginous (kind of like chia seeds!). This means they produce a gelatinous substance composed of proteins (which helps the seed to retain moisture and protects it too!). The mucilage will provide more than enough moisture for the seeds to germinate and start growing, so take these steps to ensure they thrive:
    • Shake your Seed Quilt to evenly distribute the seeds before soaking.
    • Fill your tray to a little below the initial fill line on your tray. Soak the Seed Quilt as normal, making sure the top layer turns a shade darker from absorbing water. Gently lift the seed layer of the quilt and let water drip off of it for a few seconds. Reattach the seeds onto the coconut mat in the tray.
    • The water level should remain around the bottom half of the coconut mat for the first few days, slowly receding.

Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips, How to avoid mold 

  • Colder Temps! Arugula microgreens are sensitive to colder temperatures which can cause them to take longer to germinate. This in turn can throw off their entire growth and watering cycles! Ideally the greens should be kept somewhere between 67F-90F and away from any windows where it could be a few degrees cooler.

Resources: Colder Temp Blog Post

If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Peppery Arugula, be sure to check out it's Growing Diary!

As always, reach out to our team of experiened Grow Coaches (hamama.com/help) if you have any questions or concerns while growing your Seed Quilts. We're always happy to help :) Whatever variety you choose, we want to be sure you get a lush harvest every time!

Springtime Peas

 

Growing Difficulty: Advanced!

 

Pea microgreens are sweet, nutty and refreshing! They can be enjoyed raw as a garnish to sandwiches, salads, wraps, pasta dishes, stir frys or whatever else you can think up! They can also be used to make a sweet superfood smoothie or a bright and fresh pesto. Much like our other large seeded varieties, Peas also have some quirks to look out for to ensure a successful growth each time.

 

  • Under-Soaking! Since Peas have a larger than average seed size, under-soaking tends to happen more often than normal with this particular variety. This phenomenon occurs when the Seed Quilt does not absorb enough water during the soaking step of your set-up routine. This just means the quilt may not have been pressed down into the water enough for it to go through the mat and up to the seeds.

Resource:  Soaking Blog, Soaking Video

 

  • Overwatering! Peas are at a high risk of overwatering because they can be sensitive to even a small amount of extra water. It's very important to keep an eye on the water level both prior to the soaking step and immediately following the soaking step. One thing we recommend is filling the tray just slightly below the fill line.Something to remember for all seed varieties is that you never want the seeds to be sitting in water. If your quilt is floating or submerged in water after the soaking step, it's best to dump a little out.

Resources: Soaking Blog, Soaking Video, Watering Tips, Root Hair Blog

 

  • Longer Peel Time! Most of our microgreens can begin to sprout anywhere between days 2-3 with the exception of a few varieties. The recommended peel time for Peas is between 8-10 days which is much later than most. Given that, the quilt itself will let you know when it’s ready to peel so be sure not to peel too early or too late.

Resources: How to Peel 

 

  • Unsprouted Seeds! When growing Peas you may notice several unsprouted seeds within your quilt - This is totally normal! Peas in general have a lower germination rate so we do our best to pack the Seed Quilts with a lot of seeds to make up for it. This way you still have a full harvest despite some extra ungerminated seeds. Curious what you can do with those extra seeds? Well you can always try planting them in your garden or in a pot to see if they can yield a full grown plant!

Resources: Gardening Video, Micro-gardening Blog


If you are interested in seeing the growth journey for Springtime Peas be sure to check out its Growing Diary!

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